Past Course Offerings

This page lists all the courses which have been approved for the medical humanities minor, but which are not running in the current semester.

For more information, you can visit our list of currently-offered courses, and the minor requirements.

 


Fall 2017

INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL HUMANITIES
HURC 201

Instructor: Mitchell, Beerly M.
Examines the history of medicine, concepts of disease vs illness, narrative medicine, health disparities, religion, spirituality, and the role of science and technology on the practices of healthcare. Students will develop skills in close reading, interpretation, historical contextualization, critical thinking. This course is required for the minor in Medical Humanities. (View Registrar Listing)

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 381 and ANTH 581. (View Registrar Listing)

CONSCIOUSNESS FROM INDIAN TRADITIONS TO MODERN SCIENCE
ASIA 339

Instructor: Donaldson, Brianne G.
This course explores consciousness from ancient Indian philosophies (Jain, Buddhist, and Samkhya-Yoga), alongside western concepts of consciousness from Pythagoras to modern neuroscience and animal consciousness, touching briefly upon Judeo-Christian and Taoist concepts. 2-3 guest speakers will aid our investigation. (View Registrar Listing)

INVALID WOMEN/ILLNESS IN LIT
ENGL 245

Instructor: Bracken, Rachel C.
Interdisciplinary study of cultural forms as diverse as poetry, advertisement, and film as well as topical interdisciplinary courses on literature and the arts, psychology, cultural studies, film media, anthropology, social theory, philosophy, law, and ethics. Taught by English Department Ph.D. candidates. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

MEDICINE AND MEDIA
ENGL 273 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the role of imaging technologies in the practice of medicine, and the role of mass media in shaping our understandings of the body, health, and disease. This course examines visual media structure "ways of seeing" for physicians and for the public. Emphasis will be placed on developing media literacy skills. (View Registrar Listing)

DISPARITIES IN HEALTH IN AMERICA
HEAL 380

Instructor: Hughes, Daniel C.
This course explores the aspects of race and ethnicity that influence health, public health policy, and the management and practice of healthcare, as well as, the trends which drive ethnic demographic transition including an aging white population, declining white birth rate, immigration of non-whites, and the higher birth rate of minority groups. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HEAL 380 and HEAL 580. (View Registrar Listing)

BIOMEDICAL APPROACH TO HISTORY
HIST 312

Instructor: Lopez Alonso, Moramay
This is a course in history of medicine, diseases and public health, demography, and nutrition. It delves on classic works on the history of human societies. It will also use historical studies from particular disciplines such as biology, demography, medicine, nutrition, anthropology, and economic concentrating around disease, medicine and public health. (View Registrar Listing)

HEALTH AND HUMANITIES MASTER CLASS
HURC 306/506

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
Faculty from Rice University, University of Texas School of Public health, and University of Houston, as well as practitioners in the Texas Medical Center, will lead class discussions on different aspects of the health industry today. The class will meet Tuesday evenings at the McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science and at Rice Thursdays. Students will read essays, case studies, and fiction or watch films to prepare for each discussion. Graduate students will have additional assignments. Graduate students will not write 5 papers required of undergraduates and may opt out of 3 lectures and the corresponding discussions. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HURC 506 and HURC 306. (View Registrar Listing)

MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM AND OBSERVERSHIP
NSCI 399

Instructor: Merlo, Gia
NSCI 399 consists of lectures to enhance your knowledge of medical professionalism, a writing experience aimed at reflecting on your experiences in both the lectures and clinical settings, and an opportunity to shadow a physician and/or observe in the operating room, intensive care unit or other clinical unit at Houston Methodist hospital. Once enrolled, students will have the opportunity to review the experiences of past students to select a specialty that closely aligns with your goals and expectations. Please note, matching with physicians will not occur until students begin matriculating in NSCI 399. The physician selection process will be explained during class. The process and application deadlines can be found using the following link: https://goo.gl/HD7zsO. NOTE: Space is limited and registration for NSCI 009 DOES NOT GUARANTEE a seat in NSCI 399. (View Registrar Listing)

THE HUMANITIES OF CARE & END OF LIFE
RELI/HURC 361 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
Pairing the perspectives of medicine, bioethics, and the medical humanities with thematic case studies in art, literature, cinema, and visual culture, the class examines the humanities of care and the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 345 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Kimbro, Rachel T.
This course will explore the relationship between social factors and health, illness, and mortality, with a heavy emphasis on experiences of illness, the doctor-patient relationship, and the socialization of medical students and new doctors. Social determinants of health, cultural determinants of health, and the ethics surrounding conception, birth, and death will also be discussed. (View Registrar Listing)

HEALTH, HUMANISM, AND SOCIETY SCHOLARS INTERNSHIP
HUMA 402/403

Instructor: Merlo, Gia, Ostherr, Kirsten A.
The Office of the Dean of Humanities and relevant faculty match students individually with one of a variety of projects in the area of medical humanities. Students conduct research or related activities under guidance of on-site supervisor and section instructor of record. Will be continued as HUMA 403 in Spring. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

HRC PRACTICUM IN HEALTH HUMANITIES
HURC 430

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with health institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with health professionals, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

KNOWING BODY/GLOWING MIND: BUDDHIST ARTS OF CONTEMPLATION AND ANALYSIS
RELI 333/573

Instructor: Klein, Anne C.
Buddhism is a performing art engaging both mind and body. Our course investigates Buddhist and other literature, epistemology and rituals with an eye to how they speak to contemplative practice. Contemplative practice itself, in class and out, supplements our exploration of the interplay between traditional Asian and contemporary Western perspectives. Recommended prerequisite(s): One course in Buddhism. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for RELI 333 and RELI 573. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 


Spring 17

 

Disability Inside/Out
ANTH 477

 

Instructor: Wool, Zoe H.
Topics and credit hours vary each semester. Contact department for current semester's topic(s). Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL MEDIA ARTS LAB
ENGL 386 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
Students will collaborate with health professionals to create solutions to real-world medical communication, visualization and design problems. Working individually and in teams, students will apply critical thinking and theory to hands-on design. Projects may include production of short videos, infographics, app development, 3-D virtual models, creative writing, and other media arts. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SEMINAR ON THE END OF LIFE
RELI 344 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
This course examines themes associated with death and dying from the historical through the contemporary periods. The class will adopt highly multidisciplinary approach that combines the critical perspectives of biomedicine, religious studies, art history, philosophy, anthropology, bioethics, and cultural studies as we consider life at the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

 

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE
BIOC 447

Instructor: Wagner, Daniel S.
Current biological methods offer the potential to transform health care. We will examine the biology and methodology of emergent health care technologies such as stem cell therapy and personal genome sequencing to understand their potential to impact human health. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MODERN GERMAN WRITERS: KAFKA
GERM 325 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Weissenberger, Klaus H.
Goethe's vision of "world-literature" came true in the twentieth century. German authors, among them Kafka, transcended the confines of national traditions and redefined the concepts of literature and authorship in view of a modern globally dispersed audience. Topics may vary. Taught in English. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

BIOETHICS AND INDIAN TRADITIONS
ASIA 338

Instructor: Donaldson, Brianne G.
We will examine western normative ethical theories alongside key concepts in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism regarding definitions of life, death, consciousness, autonomy, disability, pain/pleasure, and how to make decisions in issues such as animal research, disorders of consciousness, abortion, and assisted suicide, among others. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HEALTH, HUMANISM, AND SOCIETY SCHOLARS INTERNSHIP 2
HUMA 403

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
The Office of the Dean of Humanities and relevant faculty match students individually with one of a variety of projects in the area of medical humanities. Students conduct research or related activities under guidance of on-site supervisor and section instructor of record. Contuation of HUMA 402; part 2 of a year-long sequence. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL COMMUNICATION
COMM 415

Instructor: Nixon, Burke T.
This course introduces students to key issues, theories, and debates related to medical communication, while also helping students develop and reflect on their own communication strategies, and skills as future health care professionals. Sophomores and Freshmen who have fulfilled Rice's First-year Writing-Intensive Seminar requirement for graduation may register by a Special Registration Form. Recommended Prerequisite(s): Sucessfully completed one course, FWIS 101 to 199, to fulfill the Rice's First-year Writing-Intensive Seminar requirement for graduation. (View Registrar Listing)

 

DEMONS, MENTAL ILLNESS AND MEDICINE
RELI 350

Instructor: Clements, Niki K.
Treats complex connections between religious beliefs/practices and formulation of human psychology in western tradition, through a historical reckoning with demonology. Consider the way demons are represented -- from semi-corporeal beings to marks of mental illness -- by looking at texts from the ancient world to modern psychiatry. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for RELI 350 and RELI 605. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HEALTH AND HUMANITIES MASTER CLASS
HURC 306

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
Faculty from Rice University, University of Texas School of Public health, and University of Houston, as well as practitioners in the Texas Medical Center, will lead class discussions on different aspects of the health industry today. The class will meet Tuesday evenings at the McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science and at Rice Thursdays at noon. Students will read essays, case studies, and fiction or watch films to prepare for each discussion. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HURC 306 and HURC 506. (View Registrar Listing)

 

INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL HUMANITIES
HURC 201

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Examines the history of medicine, concepts of disease vs illness, narrative medicine, health disparities, religion, spirituality, and the role of science and technology on the practices of healthcare. Students will develop skills in close reading, interpretation, historical contextualization, critical thinking. This course is required for the minor in Medical Humanities. (View Registrar Listing)

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES
ENGL 245

Instructor: Beroiza, Alanna M.
Interdisciplinary study of cultural forms as diverse as poetry, advertisement, and film as well as topical interdisciplinary courses on literature and the arts, psychology, cultural studies, film media, anthropology, social theory, philosophy, law, and ethics. Taught by English Department Ph.D. candidates. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SCIENCE POLICY, AND ETHICS
NSCI 511

Instructor: Matthews, Kirstin R.
An introduction to the policy, ethics, politics, and legal issues that relate to science and technology - discovery and application. This course presents a framework for analyzing ethical issues in business and professional work. The course then explores the ways in which government policy and business practices can promote or inhibit advances in science and technology while influencing the ethical choices of the professionals involved. Case studies will be used. (View Registrar Listing)

 

POPULATION HEALTH SEMINAR
SOCI 425

Instructor: Gorman, Bridget K.
Course is a graduate level overview of population health, including the social determinates of morbidity and mortality, fertility and birth outcomes, health disparities, and contextual determinants of health. Course will cover major theoretical perspectives in the field, including fundamental cause theory, life course theory, and theories of stress and resilience. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for SOCI 425 and SOCI 525. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 381 and ANTH 581. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HRC PRACTICUM IN HEALTH HUMANITIES
HURC 430

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with health institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with health professionals, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM AND OBSERVERSHIP
NSCI 399

Instructor: Merlo, Gia
This course consists of lectures to enhance your knowledge of medical professionalism, a writing experience aimed at reflecting on your experiences in both the lectures and clinical settings, and an opportunity to shadow a physician and/or observe in the operating room, intensive care unit or other clinical unit at Houston Methodist hospital. Once enrolled in the spring, students will have the opportunity to review the experiences of past students to select a specialty that closely aligns with your goals and expectations. Please note, matching with physicians will not occur until students begin matriculating in NSCI 399. The physician selection process will be explained during the first class. The process is below: NOTE: Space is limited and registration for NSCI 009 DOES NOT GUARANTEE a seat in NSCI 399. In order to be eligible to enroll in NSCI 399, a student must: 1) Register for NSCI 009. 2) Complete all parts of the NSCI 399 Course Application (https://goo.gl/forms/eC55szbmYlewMqTr2) no later than 11:55 pm on Tuesday, November 15, 2016. The applications will be reviewed and matching will occur on a rolling basis, therefore students will be notified of the next steps on an ongoing basis from November 2, 2016 through November 15, 2016. The application can be found here: (View Registrar Listing)

CONCEIVING AND MISCONCEIVING THE MONSTROUS IN FICTION AND IN ART, IN MEDICINE AND IN BIOSCIENCE
HUMA 368 Distribution Group III

Instructor: Gustin, Michael and Harter, Deborah
However various the forms of life, we draw boundaries between the "normal," the "not normal," and the "monstrous." From the Biosciences to the Arts - from the cyclopean eye to Frankenstein - monsters illuminate (whether in fact or in fiction) who we are, how we perceive, and what we fear. (View Registrar Listing)


Fall 16

 

HEALTH AND HUMANITIES MASTER CLASS
HURC 306

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
Faculty from Rice University, University of Texas School of Public health, and University of Houston, as well as practitioners in the Texas Medical Center, will lead class discussions on different aspects of the health industry today. The class will meet Tuesday evenings at the McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science and at Rice Thursdays at noon. Students will read essays, case studies, and fiction or watch films to prepare for each discussion. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM AND OBSERVERSHIP
NSCI 399

Instructor: Merlo, Gia
This course consists of lectures to enhance your knowledge of medical professionalism, an intense writing experience aimed at reflecting on your experiences in both the lectures and clinical settings, and an opportunity to shadow a physician and/or observe in the operating room, intensive care unit or other clinical unit at Houston Methodist hospital. Once enrolled in the spring, students will have the opportunity to review the experiences of past students to select a specialty that closely aligns with your goals and expectations. Please note, matching with physicians will not occur until students begin matriculating in NSCI 399. The process is below: NOTE: Space is limited and registration for NSCI 009 DOES NOT GUARANTEE a seat in NSCI 399. In order to be eligible to enroll in NSCI 399, a student must: 1) Register for NSCI 009. 2) Complete all parts of the NSCI 399 Course Application no later than 11:55 pm on Sunday, April 10, 2016. The applications will be reviewed and matching will occur on a rolling basis, therefore students will be notified of the next steps on an ongoing basis from March 30, 2016 through April 11, 2016. The application can be found at: https://docs.google.com/a/rice.edu/forms/d/1usPT8uN8QuX8pp0fCvr7POtdjYwe... 3) Selected students will be invited to begin the Methodist credentialing process. The invitations to the MERLIN credentialing process will be sent on a rolling basis from March 30, 2016 through April 11, 2016. 4) Complete ALL PARTS of the Methodist training via the MERLIN system by: International Students (as defined by OISS) deadline is May 4, 2016 US Citizens that will be out of the country for the summer deadline is May 4, 2016 US Citizens deadline is July 22, 2016 (Information and documentation and how to complete the MERLIN training will be made available to the selected students.) 5) If selected for enrollment in NSCI 399, at the beginning of the fall semester, you must drop NSCI 009 and register for a specific section of NSCI 399 (based on shadowing time) via ESTHER before August 23, 2016 at noon. 6) Physician assignments will be determined once the fall semester is underway. 7) In fall 2016, students will attend the lecture and discussions for the entire semester. The students will shadow in addition to attending the weekly lecture and discussions starting week 8. (View Registrar Listing)

 

DISPARITIES IN HEALTH IN AMERICA
HEAL 380

Instructor: Hughes, Daniel C.
This course explores the aspects of race and ethnicity that influence health, public health policy, and the management and practice of healthcare, as well as, the trends which drive ethnic demographic transition including an aging white population, declining white birth rate, immigration of non-whites, and the higher birth rate of minority groups. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HEAL 380 and HEAL 580. (View Registrar Listing)

 

THE HUMANITIES OF CARE & END OF LIFE
RELI 361 Distribution Group I

 

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
Pairing the perspectives of medicine, bioethics, and the medical humanities with thematic case studies in art, literature, cinema, and visual culture, the class examines the humanities of care and the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

 

Disability Inside/Out
ANTH 477

Instructor: Wool, Zoe H.
Topics and credit hours vary each semester. Contact department for current semester's topic(s). Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH
SOCI 344

Instructor: Brown, Tony N.
This course investigates the meaning and significance of mental health, with heavy emphasis on the social construction of mental illness; positive psychology and psychological well-being; psychiatric epidemiology; stigma and labeling; and culture and social control. Social determinants of mental health are also discussed. (View Registrar Listing)

 

INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL HUMANITIES
HURC 201

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
Examines the history of medicine, concepts of disease vs illness, narrative medicine, health disparities, religion, spirituality, and the role of science and technology on the practices of healthcare. Students will develop skills in close reading, interpretation, historical contextualization, critical thinking. This course is required for the minor in Medical Humanities. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICINE AND MEDIA
ENGL 273 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the role of imaging technologies in the practice of medicine, and the role of mass media in shaping our understandings of the body, health, and disease. This course examines visual media structure "ways of seeing" for physicians and for the public. Emphasis will be placed on developing media literacy skills. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HEALTH AND HUMANITIES MASTER CLASS
HURC 506

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
Faculty from Rice University, University of Texas School of Public health, and University of Houston, as well as practitioners in the Texas Medical Center, will lead class discussions on different aspects of the health industry today. The class will meet Tuesday evenings at the McGovern Museum of Health and Medical Science and at Rice Thursdays at noon. Students will read essays, case studies, and fiction or watch films to prepare for each discussion. Graduate students will have additional assignments. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SOCIAL AUTOPSIES: HOW SOCIETY KILLS US
SOCI 422

Instructor: Denney, Justin
This course explores mortality, and how long we live, as a social process. Though we often reflect on the biological, physiological, and genetic conditions that play parts in the length of our lives, we will explore evidence suggesting that social conditions shape mortality prospects for all of us. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HRC PRACTICUM IN HEALTH HUMANITIES
HURC 430

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with health institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with health professionals, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

THE HUMANITIES OF CARE & END OF LIFE
HURC 361 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
Pairing the perspectives of medicine, bioethics, and the medical humanities with thematic case studies in art, literature, cinema, and visual culture, the class examines the humanities of care and the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

 

BODY, TECHNOLOGY, ENHANCEMENT
ANTH 582

Instructor: Wool, Zoe H.
Seminar on the body and the various technologies that are used to optimize it. Includes topics such as cosmetic surgery, diet supplementation, pharmaceutical enhancement and body art. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

LITERATURE AND MEDICINE
ENGL 272 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Bracken, Rachel C.
Designed for, but not limited to, students interested in the medical profession, this course introduces the study of medicine through reading imaginative literature--novels, plays, essays, poems--by and about doctors and patients, focusing on understanding ethical issues and on developing critical and interpretive skills. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HEALTH DISPARITIES IN THE UNITED STATES
SOCI 377

Instructor: Gorman, Bridget K.
This class will explore patterns and explanations surrounding health disparities in the United States based on key status characteristics (socioeconomic status, race/ethnic identity, nativity, gender, and sexual orientation). We will draw on interdisciplinary scholarship covering diverse fields (e.g., medical sociology, social demography, public health, public policy) and methodologies. (View Registrar Listing)


Spring 16

 

19TH CENTURY PSYCHOLOGICAL FICTION AND MEDICINE
HURC 211 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
The Romantic and Victorian periods saw debates among literary and medical authors over the nature, function, and location of consciousness. This course explores these debates to learn the history of a literary and medical movement, critically engage with present-day debates about these texts, and reflect on the changing relationship between sciences and humanities in general. (View Registrar Listing)

 

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE
BIOC 447

Instructor: Wagner, Daniel S.
Current biological methods offer the potential to transform health care. We will examine the biology and methodology of emergent health care technologies such as stem cell therapy and personal genome sequencing to understand their potential to impact human health. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. (View Registrar Listing)

 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MEDICINE
PHIL 314 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Engelhardt, H T.
The biomedical sciences, the practice of medicine, and health care policy employ concepts of health, disease, disability, and defect in explanatory accounts, intermixing factual claims with moral and other evaluations. This course explores the interplay of evaluation and explanation in medicine's models of disease and health. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HRC PRACTICUM IN HEALTH HUMANITIES
HURC 430

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
This practice-based course is conducted in partnership with health institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 5-10 hours/week on site with health professionals, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

CRITICAL HUMANITIES - HEALTH AND BODY
HURC 307 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
This course comprises six modules co-taught by faculty and medical professionals. Modules will address DNA and genetics, changes in medical education, the pathologization of difference, the process of dying, disability and ability, the doctor-patient relationship, and more. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM AND OBSERVERSHIP
NSCI 399

Instructor: Merlo, Gia
This course consists of lectures to enhance your knowledge of medical professionalism, an intense writing experience aimed at reflecting on your experiences in both the lectures and clinical settings, and an opportunity to shadow a physician and/or observe in the operating room, intensive care unit or other clinical unit at Houston Methodist hospital. Once enrolled in the spring, students will have the opportunity to review the experiences of past students to select a specialty that closely aligns with your goals and expectations. Please note, matching with physicians will not occur until students begin matriculating in NSCI 399. (View Registrar Listing)

 

TOPICS IN MEDICAL ETHICS
PHIL 336 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brody, Baruch A.
A philosophical examination of some of the fundamental issues in clinical ethics, including informed consent, competency, confidentiality, end of life decision making, the definition of death, allocating scarce medical resources, and the role of economic analysis in clinical decision making. Readings drawn from the clinical and philosophical literature. (View Registrar Listing)

 

DEMONS, MENTAL ILLNESS AND MEDICINE
RELI 350

Instructor: Clements, Niki K.
Treats complex connections between religious beliefs/practices and formulation of human psychology in western tradition, through a historical reckoning with demonology. Consider the way demons are represented -- from semi-corporeal beings to marks of mental illness -- by looking at texts from the ancient world to modern psychiatry. (View Registrar Listing)

 

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MEDICAL HUMANITIES RESEARCH
HUMA 401

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
Independent Study with a faculty member at the Texas Medical Center focusing on a medical humanities research topic. Students spend up to 10 hours/week at TMC and are graded on evaluations submitted by faculty supervisors. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

ILLNESS, DISABILITY, AND THE GENDERED BODY
ANTH 354

Instructor: Wool, Zoe H.
This course draws on critical disability studies and medical anthropology to explore how gender and sexuality matter in contexts of illness and disability across a range of institutional, social, and national contexts. We pay particular attention to the ways illness and disability expose, disturb, or retrench normative arrangements of gender. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SCIENCE POLICY, AND ETHICS
NSCI 511

Instructor: Matthews, Kirstin R.
An introduction to the policy, ethics, politics, and legal issues that relate to science and technology - discovery and application. This course presents a framework for analyzing ethical issues in business and professional work. The course then explores the ways in which government policy and business practices can promote or inhibit advances in science and technology while influencing the ethical choices of the professionals involved. Case studies will be used. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MASTERCLASS IN PUBLISHING, EDITING, PRESENTING AND PUBLIC WRITING
HURC 606

Instructor: Campana, Joseph A.
Offers undergraduate and graduate students insight into the public life of writing with particular attention to academic and literary publishing, editing, and presenting. Sessions organized around topics in these areas and visits with experts (agents, editors, authors, presenters, etc.) with experience in publishing, and creating series, festivals, and other forms of presentation. Meets 3 times per semester, helps develop internship possibilities for participants, and develop strategies for increasing the presentation of public writing at Rice. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HURC 606 and HURC 406. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

THE DOCTOR IS ON
HURC 213 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Kozicki, Benjamin J.
Fictionalized characters such as House, Doogie Houser, and Hawkeye Pierce reinforce stereotypes as much as they challenge assumptions and (re)define cultural attitudes toward doctors (and the medical profession in general). This course examines the portrayal of healthcare professionals in television, fiction and film to discuss philosophical and ethical questions as well as the modern medical apparatus from biopolitical and social systems perspectives. (View Registrar Listing)

 

CONCEIVING AND MISCONCEIVING THE MONSTROUS IN FICTION AND IN ART, IN MEDICINE AND IN BIOSCIENCE
HUMA 368 Distribution Group III

Instructor: Gustin, Michael and Harter, Deborah
However various the forms of life, we draw boundaries between the "normal," the "not normal," and the "monstrous." From the Biosciences to the Arts - from the cyclopean eye to Frankenstein - monsters illuminate (whether in fact or in fiction) who we are, how we perceive, and what we fear. (View Registrar Listing)


Fall 15

 

PRACTICUM CLINICAL LEADERSHIP
LEAD 399

Instructor: Merlo, Gia
This course provides students with the opportunity to shadow a physician at Houston Methodist hospital, a seminar series to enhance their knowledge of medical professionalism, and an intense writing experience aimed at reflecting on the Entrustable Professional Activities as defined by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The mandatory weekly seminar will be held on Mondays from 5-6pm. To register for LEAD 399 in Fall 2015, you must add LEAD 009 to your schedule. Prior to the beginning of the semester, when physician assignments are disseminated, you will be required to register for LEAD 399 and drop LEAD 009 from your schedule if you have matched to a shadowing time. This should be done through ESTHER. NOTE: REGISTRATION FOR LEAD 009 DOES NOT GUARANTEE A SEAT IN LEAD 399. We will attempt to accommodate as many students as possible. HOWEVER, in order to matriculate into and register for LEAD 399, a student must: 1) Register for LEAD 009. 2) Complete all parts of the LEAD 399 Course Application due Wednesday, April 15 at noon. URL to course application: https://docs.google.com/a/rice.edu/forms/d/1lmxDvVfDpmAwiFnRNgMQJ4-Vg4A-... 3) Be matched to a physician through the process defined in the LEAD 399 Course Application. 4) At the beginning of the fall semester, drop LEAD 009 and register for a specific section of LEAD 399 based on their given shadowing time via ESTHER. 5) Complete ALL PARTS of the Methodist training via the MERLIN system due Friday, August 14, 2015 at noon. Information on documentation and how to complete the MERLIN training will be forthcoming. Registrants of LEAD 009 that successfully complete the course application by April 15 will be contacted with their physician assignment by April 22. If a student matches to a physician but fails to complete the MERLIN training by August 14, then his/her match will be revoked. If a student does not match to a physician assignment by April 22, then the student will either be asked for more potential timings that they could shadow or will be contacted and placed on a waiting list maintained in the department (not visible on ESTHER) as more shadowing spots may be created during the summer. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MASTERCLASS IN PUBLISHING, EDITING, PRESENTING AND PUBLIC WRITING
HURC 606

Instructor: Campana, Joseph A.
Offers undergraduate and graduate students insight into the public life of writing with particular attention to academic and literary publishing, editing, and presenting. Sessions organized around topics in these areas and visits with experts (agents, editors, authors, presenters, etc.) with experience in publishing, and creating series, festivals, and other forms of presentation. Meets 3 times per semester, helps develop internship possibilities for participants, and develop strategies for increasing the presentation of public writing at Rice. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HURC 606 and HURC 406. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 345 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Kimbro, Rachel T.
This course will explore the relationship between social factors and health, illness, and mortality, with a heavy emphasis on experiences of illness, the doctor-patient relationship, and the socialization of medical students and new doctors. Social determinants of health, cultural determinants of health, and the ethics surrounding conception, birth, and death will also be discussed. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. (View Registrar Listing)

 

DISPARITIES IN HEALTH IN AMERICA
HEAL 380

Instructor: Rodriguez, Augusto X.
This course explores the aspects of race and ethnicity that influence health, public health policy, and the management and practice of healthcare, as well as, the trends which drive ethnic demographic transition including an aging white population, declining white birth rate, immigration of non-whites, and the higher birth rate of minority groups. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HEAL 380 and HEAL 580. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HEALTH AND HUMANITIES MASTER CLASS
HURC 506

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
A medical archivist, a current medical student, an epidemiologist, and a hospital case manager will lead class discussions on different aspects of the health industry today. The class will also go on field trips and read a short essay and watch a film to prepare for each discussion. Meets six times during the semester. Graduate students will have additional assignments. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

ETHNOGRAPHIES OF CARE
ANTH 342

Instructor: Wool, Zoe H.
An ethnographically grounded exploration of the political, social, and intimate relations that constitute care in various situations of life and death. We ask how particular populations come to be understood as requiring, receiving, or being entitle to care? Who becomes obliged to provide care? And what are care's collateral effects? (View Registrar Listing)

 

SEMINAR ON THE END OF LIFE
RELI 344 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
This course examines themes associated with death and dying from the historical through the contemporary periods. The class will adopt highly multidisciplinary approach that combines the critical perspectives of biomedicine, religious studies, art history, philosophy, anthropology, bioethics, and cultural studies as we consider life at the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

 

HEALTH AND HUMANITIES MASTER CLASS
HURC 306

Instructor: Bailar, Melissa A.
A medical archivist, a current medical student, an epidemiologist, and a hospital case manager will lead class discussions on different aspects of the health industry today. The class will also go on field trips and read a short essay and watch a film to prepare for each discussion. Meets six times during the semester. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICINE AND MEDIA
ENGL 273 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Nelson, Jon N.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the role of imaging technologies in the practice of medicine, and the role of mass media in shaping our understandings of the body, health, and disease. This course examines visual media structure "ways of seeing" for physicians and for the public. Emphasis will be placed on developing media literacy skills. (View Registrar Listing)

 

GENDER AND HEALTH
SOCI 465

Instructor: Gorman, Bridget K.
This seminar explores the relationship between gender and health (longevity, physical illness and functioning, mental health, and health behavior). Specific topics include masculinity, disease expression, medical research, health care use, stress and social relationships, and intersectionality (race/ethnicity and sexuality) as they relate shaping health outcomes among men and women. (View Registrar Listing)


Spring 15

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. (View Registrar Listing)

 

LITERATURE AND MEDICINE
ENGL 272 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Goode, Abby L.
Designed for, but not limited to, students interested in the medical profession, this course introduces the study of medicine through reading imaginative literature--novels, plays, essays, poems--by and about doctors and patients, focusing on understanding ethical issues and on developing critical and interpretive skills. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SCIENCE POLICY, AND ETHICS
NSCI 511

Instructor: Matthews, Kirstin R.
An introduction to the policy, ethics, politics, and legal issues that relate to science and technology - discovery and application. This course presents a framework for analyzing ethical issues in business and professional work. The course then explores the ways in which government policy and business practices can promote or inhibit advances in science and technology while influencing the ethical choices of the professionals involved. Case studies will be used. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL MEDIA ARTS LAB
ENGL 386 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
Students will collaborate with health professionals to create solutions to real-world medical communication, visualization and design problems. Working individually and in teams, students will apply critical thinking and theory to hands-on design. Projects may include production of short videos, infographics, app development, 3-D virtual models, creative writing, and other media arts. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

ETHICS, MEDICINE, AND PUBLIC POLICY
PHIL 315 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Engelhardt, H T.
The relationship between theories of justice and accounts of the proper allocation of health care is explored. The first half examines Rawls' "Theory of Justice", Nozick's "Anarchy, State, and Utopia", and other accounts of justice and health care. The second addresses specific problems in the allocation of health care resources. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SEMINAR ON THE END OF LIFE
RELI 344 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
This course examines themes associated with death and dying from the historical through the contemporary periods. The class will adopt highly multidisciplinary approach that combines the critical perspectives of biomedicine, religious studies, art history, philosophy, anthropology, bioethics, and cultural studies as we consider life at the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

 

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE
BIOC 447

Instructor: Wagner, Daniel S.
Current biological methods offer the potential to transform health care. We will examine the biology and methodology of emergent health care technologies such as stem cell therapy and personal genome sequencing to understand their potential to impact human health. (View Registrar Listing)

CONCEIVING AND MISCONCEIVING THE MONSTROUS IN FICTION AND IN ART, IN MEDICINE AND IN BIOSCIENCE
HUMA 368

Instructor: Gustin, Michael and Harter, Deborah
However various the forms of life, we draw boundaries between the "normal," the "not normal," and the "monstrous." From the Biosciences to the Arts - from the cyclopean eye to Frankenstein - monsters illuminate (whether in fact or in fiction) who we are, how we perceive, and what we fear. (View Registrar Listing)


Fall 14

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL HUMANITIES VISUAL CULTURE
HART 396 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
In this course we will examine literal and symbolic representations of the human body in order to explore the relations between the visuality of medicine, corporeality, subjectivity, and healing. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

DEMONS, MENTAL ILLNESS AND MEDICINE
RELI 350

Instructor: Clements, Niki K.
Treats complex connections between religious beliefs/practices and formulation of human psychology in western tradition, through a historical reckoning with demonology. Consider the way demons are represented -- from semi-corporeal beings to marks of mental illness -- by looking at texts from the ancient world to modern psychiatry. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICINE AND MEDIA
ENGL 273 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the role of imaging technologies in the practice of medicine, and the role of mass media in shaping our understandings of the body, health, and disease. This course examines visual media structure "ways of seeing" for physicians and for the public. Emphasis will be placed on developing media literacy skills. (View Registrar Listing)

 

DEMONS, MENTAL ILLNESS AND MEDICINE
RELI 605

Instructor: Clements, Niki K.
Treats complex connections between religious beliefs/practices and formulation of human psychology in western tradition, through a historical reckoning with demonology. Consider the way demons are represented -- from semi-corporeal beings to marks of mental illness -- by looking at texts from the ancient world to modern psychiatry. RELI 605 requires: 7,500-10,000 word research paper and oral presentation. (View Registrar Listing)


Spring 14

 

TOPICS IN MEDICAL ETHICS
PHIL 336 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer A.
A philosophical examination of some of the fundamental issues in clinical ethics, including informed consent, competency, confidentiality, end of life decision making, the definition of death, allocating scarce medical resources, and the role of economic analysis in clinical decision making. Readings drawn from the clinical and philosophical literature. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MODERN GERMAN WRITERS: KAFKA
GERM 325 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Weissenberger, Klaus H.
Goethe's vision of "world-literature" came true in the twentieth century. German authors, among them Kafka, transcended the confines of national traditions and redefined the concepts of literature and authorship in view of a modern globally dispersed audience. Topics may vary. Taught in English. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MEDICINE
PHIL 314 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Engelhardt, H T.
The biomedical sciences, the practice of medicine, and health care policy employ concepts of health, disease, disability, and defect in explanatory accounts, intermixing factual claims with moral and other evaluations. This course explores the interplay of evaluation and explanation in medicine's models of disease and health. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL MEDIA ARTS LAB
ENGL 386

Instructor: Ostherr, Kirsten A.
Students will collaborate with health professionals to create solutions to real-world medical communication, visualization and design problems. Working individually and in teams, students will apply critical thinking and theory to hands-on design. Projects may include production of short videos, infographics, app development, 3-D virtual models, creative writing, and other media arts. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SCIENCE POLICY, AND ETHICS
NSCI 511

Instructor: Matthews, Kirstin R.
An introduction to the policy, ethics, politics, and legal issues that relate to science and technology - discovery and application. This course presents a framework for analyzing ethical issues in business and professional work. The course then explores the ways in which government policy and business practices can promote or inhibit advances in science and technology while influencing the ethical choices of the professionals involved. Case studies will be used. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY
SOCI 345 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Barnes, Ann S.
This course will explore the relationship between social factors and health, illness, and mortality, with a heavy emphasis on experiences of illness, the doctor-patient relationship, and the socialization of medical students and new doctors. Social determinants of health, cultural determinants of health, and the ethics surrounding conception, birth, and death will also be discussed. (View Registrar Listing)

 

EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE
BIOC 447

Instructor: Wagner, Daniel S.
Current biological methods offer the potential to transform health care. We will examine the biology and methodology of emergent health care technologies such as stem cell therapy and personal genome sequencing to understand their potential to impact human health. (View Registrar Listing)

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. (View Registrar Listing)


Fall 13

 

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 381 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Mitchell, Beverly M.
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. (View Registrar Listing)

 

SEMINAR ON THE END OF LIFE
RELI 344 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
This course examines themes associated with death and dying from the historical through the contemporary periods. The class will adopt highly multidisciplinary approach that combines the critical perspectives of biomedicine, religious studies, art history, philosophy, anthropology, bioethics, and cultural studies as we consider life at the end of life. (View Registrar Listing)

 

LITERATURE AND MEDICINE
ENGL 272 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Banner, Olivia
Designed for, but not limited to, students interested in the medical profession, this course introduces the study of medicine through reading imaginative literature--novels, plays, essays, poems--by and about doctors and patients, focusing on understanding ethical issues and on developing critical and interpretive skills. (View Registrar Listing)