Past Course Offerings

Spring 2019

 

Electives

Space, Place, Landscape
ANTH 355 

Instructor: Morgan, Molly
This course provides an overview of the way archaeologists study space, place and landscape, including studies that emphasize ecological, symbolic, political economic and religious aspects. Recent theoretical work on space, place and landscape will be emphasized, as well as archaeological methods of investigation and interpretation, including remote sensing, surveying, and GIS.

 
Ceramics and Society
ANTH 477

Instructor: Morgan, Molly
This seminar will provide students with the skills and knowledge to describe, characterize, analyze, and draw interpretations from ceramic artifacts commonly recovered from archaeological sites. Through a combination of hands-on projects and discussion themes, the course examines several aspects of archaeological ceramics including their production and distribution, as well as their significance in social, political, economic, and ritual contexts.

 
Foundations in Architecture
ARCH 345, Distribution Group I

Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
Lectures and discussions focusing on significant architectural and urban practices and ideas formulated before 1850.

 

The Chemistry of Art
CHEM 176 Distribution Group III

Instructor: Whitmire, Kenton
The chemistry of the materials and methods used to create, conserve and authenticate art objects will be presented. Topics will include sculpture, painting, photography, textiles, jewelry, furniture, etc. Taught in conjunction with the Conservation Department and Staff of the MFAH. 

 

Road to Santiago
FWIS 134 001, FWIS 134 002

Instructor: Sweeney, Kyle
Over 300,000 pilgrims walked the Camino to Santiago de Compostela last year. This seminar investigates the origins and growth of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages. Primary texts, novels, films, and the rich visual culture of the period will be examined to better understand the historical context of this enduring ritual.

 

Fakes, Forgeries, and Stolen Art
FWIS 155

Instructor: Fuqua, Kariann
In 1990, two men stole 13 paintings worth an estimated $300 million dollars from the Gardner Museum. The crime remains unsolved, and an estimated 40% of artwork on the market today is either faked or forged. This course will analyze these and other high-profile issues through essays, literature, and film.

 

Museums in World History
HIST 244, Distribution Group I

Instructor: Ward, Kerry
Examining museums in global history gives critical insight into their present role in society. Museums were sites of identity at local, regional, national, imperial and global levels. The collection and display of objects allowed communities, states, and empires to use cultural heritage, history, and science to interpret the past.

 

Master Class in Cultural Heritage
HURC 401

Instructor: Roof, Judith
This course consists of a series of sessions with Rice faculty and outside speakers that focus on specific texts to explore important critical questions and debates. There will be 14 master class sessions per term. At the end of the semester, the students will present their own work in a symposium.

 

Spatial Humanities: The American 1930s
HURC 432 (section 1)

Instructor: Richardson, Laura
The American 1930s witnessed a natural and manmade topographical dynamism unmatched by any other modern U.S. decade. What are the connections between a rapidly remolding American landscape and the coevolution of modernist aesthetics in the 1930s? This course encourages students to answer this question from the perspective of a spatial humanist—a scholar who considers the roles of time, place, and landscape in micro-stories of everyday life and the macro-narratives of the broader human condition.

 

Spatial Humanities: Space/Time/Travel, 1400-1700
HURC 432 (section 4)

Instructor: Narkin, Elisabeth & Sweeney, Kyle
The American 1930s witnessed a natural and manmade topographical dynamism unmatched by any other modern U.S. decade. What are the connections between a rapidly remolding American landscape and the coevolution of modernist aesthetics in the 1930s? This course encourages students to answer this question from the perspective of a spatial humanist—a scholar who considers the roles of time, place, and landscape in micro-stories of everyday life and the macro-narratives of the broader human condition.


Practica

MUSEUM INTERNSHIP II
HART 301

Instructor: Costello, Robert L.
The aim of this course is to provide select students a practicum in museum work accompanied by an introduction to a history of museums, including the varieties of museums, their role in society and significant issues in museums today. 

 

HRC PRACTICUM IN CULTURAL HERITAGE
HURC 423

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with cultural heritage institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with curators, artists, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. 

Fall 2018

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
ANTH 205 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Fleisher, Jeffrey B.
An introduction to the elementary concepts of the discipline through a series of case studies. (View Registrar Listing)

AFRICAN PREHISTORY
ANTH 312

Instructor: Fleisher, Jeffrey B.
Thematic coverage of developments throughout the continent from the Lower Paleolithic to medieval times, with emphasis on food production, metallurgy and the rise of cities and complex societies. Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 312 and ANTH 512. (View Registrar Listing)

HISTORY & THEORY I (INTRO)
ARCH 225 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Geiser, Reto
This introductory course exposes student's issues and debates that have driven architects and theorists from the early twentieth century to the present. The course is structured around a sequence of fourteen themes that have recurred as major issues throughout architectural history. Focusing on topics, ranging from representation, to media, to politics, urbanity, or the environment, teach theme is presented as a debate between differing viewpoints, in order to expose the positions that have motivated both theory and practice. In weekly discussion sections, we will be analyzing buildings and discussing canonical texts. These sections provide opportunities for students to develop their own positions on the issues debated, and to refine their ability to make arguments. Credit cannot be earned for ARCH 225 and ARCH 525. (View Registrar Listing)

PRACTICAL CURATION AND INSTITUTIONAL CRITIQUE
ARTS 477

Instructor: Sperandio, Christopher J.
Historically, Institutional Critique is a critically minded art movement involving the interrogation of art institutions and conventions associated with the practice of the sisplay of art works and objects of historical or cultural import. Artists like Hans Haacke, Adrian Piper, and Fred Wilson have prsented Institutional Critique works internationally. By learning about inhabting the established practice of Institutional Critique, students will gain experience in many aspects of the production of an exhibition. Modules will address historical research as utilized by the artists of Institutional Critique, the professional handling of objects, the development of a curatorial thesis, exhibition design and construction, and the production of a professional exhibition. (Registrar Listing TK, contact instructor.)

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND THE PUBLIC HUMANITIES
ENGL/HURC 299

Instructor: Choate, Evan W.
In this course, students learn to apply critical humanistic methods to issues of public importance, especially in the Houston area. Participants study necessary applications of humanistic inquiry to civic life and contribute to this work themselves. Topics vary each semester. Past topics have included: Surreal Houston; Curating Heritage; (Dis)locating Art. Consult the Humanities Research Center or the English Department for more information. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION
FILM 327 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Stringer, Tish M.
Study of the expressive possibilities of documentary production using digital systems. Space in studio classes is limited. Registration does not guarantee a place in class. The class roster is formulated on the first day of class by the individual instructor. (View Registrar Listing)

FAKES, FORGERIES, AND STOLEN ART
FWIS 155

Instructor: Fuqua, Kariann
In 1990, two men stole 13 paintings worth an estimated $300 million dollars from the Gardner Museum. The crime remains unsolved, and an estimated 40% of artwork on the market today is either faked or forged. This course will analyze these and other high-profile issues through essays, literature, and film. (View Registrar Listing)

MUSEUM INTERNSHIP I
HART 300

Instructor: Costello, Robert L.
The aim of this course is to provide select students a practicum in museum work accompanied by an introduction to a history of museums, including the varieties of museums, their role in society and significant issues in museums today. (View Registrar Listing)

BAYOU BEND UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP I
HART 400

Instructor: Manca, Joseph P.
Undergraduate Internship at Bayou Bend, the American Decorative Arts Center of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Must be a Jameson Fellowship recipient to enroll. Credit cannot be earned for HART 400 and HART 603. (View Registrar Listing)

Arts and Culture Internship 1
HUMA 406

The Office of the Dean of Humanities and relevant faculty match students individually with one of a variety of projects in the area of arts/museums/public culture. Students conduct research or related activities under guidance of on-site supervisor and the section instructor of record. Will be continued as HUMA 407 in Spring. Department Permission Required. Repeatable for Credit. Contact Neva Agwunobi with questions. (View Registrar Listing)

HRC PRACTICUM IN CULTURAL HERITAGE
HURC 423

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with cultural heritage institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with curators, artists, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)


Spring 2018

THE POLITICS OF THE PAST: ARCHAEOLOGY IN SOCIAL CONTEXT
ANTH 345 Distribution Group II

Instructor: McIntosh, Susan K.
An examination of the way that archaeological evidence of the past has been used and viewed by particular groups at different times. Using case studies, the course considers issues of gender, race, Eurocentrism, political domination and legitimacy that emerge from critical analysis of representations of the past by archaeologists, museums, and collectors. Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 345 and ANTH 545. (View Registrar Listing)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNIQUES
ANTH 362/562 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Fleisher, Jeffrey B.
Methods used in fieldwork, laboratory analysis, and interpretation of archaeological data from a local site excavated by the class. Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 362 and ANTH 562. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

EARLY CIVILIZATIONS
ANTH 363 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Morgan, Molly
A comparative study of the civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus, China, and the Maya, emphasizing the causes and conditions of their origins. Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 363 and ANTH 563. (View Registrar Listing)

HISTORY AND THEORY II - PRE 1890
ARCH 345/645, HART 345/645 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Schmidt, Sebastian
An in-depth exploration as to why select monuments from Antiquity through the 19th century were 'canonized' in popular imagination and given referential status. Following a case study format, each week will focus on a particular building, built or unbuilt, from both Western and Eastern traditions. Credit cannot be earned for ARCH 345 and ARCH 235/ARCH 535. (View Registrar Listing)

THE CHEMISTRY OF ART
CHEM 176

Instructor: Whitmire, Kenton H.
The chemistry of the materials and methods used to create, conserve and authenticate art objects will be presented. Topics will include sculpture, painting, photography, textiles, jewelry, furniture, etc. Taught in conjunction with the Conservation Department and Staff of the MFAH. Some classes will be held at the MFAH or HMNS. (View Registrar Listing)

FAKES, FORGERIES, AND STOLEN ART
FWIS 155

Instructor: Fuqua, Kariann
In 1990, two men stole 13 paintings worth an estimated $300 million dollars from the Gardner Museum. The crime remains unsolved, and an estimated 40% of artwork on the market today is either faked or forged. This course will analyze these and other high-profile issues through essays, literature, and film. (View Registrar Listing)

POLITICS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE IN THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST, 1800 TO THE PRESENT
HART 314

Instructor: Acikgoz, Umit F.
This seminar will examine the history of the concept of "cultural heritage" in the modern Middle East. We will explore the emergence of concerns for archaeological sites and architectural monuments, and the ability of cultural heritage to shore up contested claims of identity, ideology, and political legitimacy. (View Registrar Listing)

LOOKING AT EUROPEAN PRINTS 1400-1700
HART 333/525

Instructor: Wolfthal, Diane B.
The class has several goals: to gain a thorough historical understanding of prints by major masters as Schongauer, Mantegna, Der, and Rembrandt as well as more popular prints, explore key issues in the study of prints, such as how they revolutionized European culture, their patronage, markets, functions, and techniques; and to examine the prints first-hand. Credit cannot be earned for HART 333 and HART 525. (View Registrar Listing)

ISLAMIC ART AND EMPIRE
HIST 477

Instructor: Balabanlilar, Lisa A. and Froom, Aimee.
This class is an introduction to the visual, material, cultural, religious, and political systems of the great Islamic empires of the early modern Muslim world, enhanced by the unique opportunity for close study of Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal art works in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

SPATIAL HUMANITIES
HURC 432

Section 004: The Social Lives of Buildings (France) (View Registrar Listing)
Instructor: Narkin, Elisabeth D.

Section 003: Procedural Greco-Roman Cities (View Registrar Listing)
Instructor: Saldana, Marie G.

This course will trace the evolution of a city as it existed and as it was imagined. Views, historic maps, and ground-floor plans will be located in both time and space while their associated visual and spatial data will be integrated across digital platforms. Graduate students enroll in an additional bootcamp and mentor undergraduate students. Credit cannot be earned for HURC 432 and HURC 632. Repeatable for Credit.

MEDICINE AND THE MUSEUM: CLINICAL AESTHETICS AND THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
RELI 335 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Brennan, Marcia G.
Through weekly visits to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, this class develops key skills and engages relevant themes relating to medicine and caregiving, including observation and description, embodiment and motion, eros and suffering, vulnerable populations, grief and loss, human mortality and spiritual transcendence. (View Registrar Listing)

POLITICS OF REPRESENTATION: HOW WE UNDERSTAND "WAR" AND "THE RACIAL OTHER"
SOCI 365/ANTH 365

Instructor: Sharim, Yehuda
Does media show how things really are? This class explores the politics of representation, particularly in times of social mayhem, revolution, and war. Although we will focus primarily on cultural and political representations of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, this class will also put this dispute in comparison with other global events. (View Registrar Listing)

The Cultural Heritage minor offers a wide range of practica courses for advanced students. Please see the Minor Requirements page on the registrar's site for more information.

Registration will open in the Spring for two Summer-term practica in archaeological field techniques. Contact Kerry Ward and John Hopkins for more information.

MUSEUM INTERNSHIP II
HART 301

Instructor: Costello, Robert L.
The aim of this course is to provide select students a practicum in museum work accompanied by an introduction to a history of museums, including the varieties of museums, their role in society and significant issues in museums today. (View Registrar Listing)

BAYOU BEND UNDERGRADUATE INTERNSHIP II
HART 401/HART 604

Instructor: Manca, Joseph P.
Undergraduate Internship at Bayou Bend and The American Decorative Arts Center of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Must be a Jameson Fellowship recipient to enroll. Credit cannot be earned for HART 401 and HART 604. (View Registrar Listing)

ARTS AND CULTURE INTERNSHIP 2
HUMA 407

Instructors vary.
The Office of the Dean of Humanities and relevant faculty match students individually with one of a variety of projects in the area of arts/museums/public culture. Students conduct research or related activities under guidance of on-site supervisor and the section instructor of record. Continuation of HUMA 406; part 2 of a year-long sequence. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

HRC PRACTICUM IN CULTURAL HERITAGE
HURC 423

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with cultural heritage institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with curators, artists, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)


FALL 2017

MUSEUMS AND HERITAGE: EXHIBITING ART, EXHIBITING CULTURE
ANTH 341

Instructors: McIntosh, Susan K. and Hopkins, John
A wide-ranging introduction to museum studies with a particular focus on the collection and exhibition of cultural heritage materials. We will examine how heritage objects are displayed and represented in museums of art, natural historical history, and heritage. Topics include looking and ethics of collecting, policies of display, changing roles for museums; exhibition design and curatorial practice. (View Registrar Listing)

INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

ANTH 205 Distribution Group II

Instructor: Fleisher, Jeffrey B.
An introduction to the elementary concepts of the discipline through a series of case studies. (View Registrar Listing)

DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION
ANTH 324 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Stringer, Tish M.
Study of the expressive possibilities of documentary production using digital systems. Space in studio classes is limited. Registration does not guarantee a place in class. The class roster is formulated on the first day of class by the individual instructor. (View Registrar Listing)

HISTORY & THEORY I (INTRO)
ARCH 225 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Geiser, Reto
This introductory course exposes student's issues and debates that have driven architects and theorists from the early twentieth century to the present. The course is structured around a sequence of fourteen themes that have recurred as major issues throughout architectural history. Focusing on topics, ranging from representation, to media, to politics, urbanity, or the environment, teach theme is presented as a debate between differing viewpoints, in order to expose the positions that have motivated both theory and practice. In weekly discussion sections, we will be analyzing buildings and discussing canonical texts. These sections provide opportunities for students to develop their own positions on the issues debated, and to refine their ability to make arguments. Credit cannot be earned for ARCH 225 and ARCH 525. (View Registrar Listing)

EXHIBITION DESIGN
ARTS 378

Instructor: Sperandio, Christopher J.
This course will explore the world of museums and galleries through exhibition design. Students will study the curatorial process and exhibition preparation including concept development, educational goals, budget, installation, and publicity. Discussions, workshops, museum visits, and guest lectures will provide students the opportunity to gain practical experience in museum/gallery work. (View Registrar Listing)

FAKES, FORGERIES, AND STOLEN ART
FWIS 155

Instructor: Fuqua, Kariann
In 1990, two men stole 13 paintings worth an estimated $300 million dollars from the Gardner Museum. The crime remains unsolved, and an estimated 40% of artwork on the market today is either faked or forged. This course will analyze these and other high-profile issues through essays, literature, and film. (View Registrar Listing)

INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I: ANTIQUITY TO GOTHIC
HART 101 Distribution Group I

Instructor: Neagley, Linda
A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Antiquity through the 15th century. Students will also attend a one-hour weekly tutorial with a teaching assistant. (View Registrar Listing)

ADVANCED STUDY IN MUSEUMS AND HERITAGE: ARTS OF ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN AT THE MENIL COLLECTION
HART 312

Instructor: Hopkins, John
This course introduces students to advanced ethical, legal and practical issues facing museums as they acquire and maintain collections from areas prone to looting and destruction, especially the Ancient Mediterranean. We will examine the civic engagement and operation of the Menil Collection through close, on-site archival and object study. Credit cannot be earned for HART 312 and HART 540. (View Registrar Listing)

CINEMAS OF URBAN ALIENATION
HART 359

Instructor: Hamadeh, Shirine T.
This seminar examines cinematic engagements with urban spaces and experiences around the world spanning the last two centuries. Particular attention will be paid to issues of migration, marginality, colonialism, war and post-war, nostalgia and memory, race and gender. Cities of focus include Berlin, Istanbul, Moscow, Algiers, Beirut and Paris. Our weekly discussions of individual films will be grounded in critical writings of the cities' histories and theories of space and film. Credit cannot be earned for HART 359 and HART 659. (View Registrar Listing)

SPATIAL HUMANITIES
HURC 432

Instructor: El-Dahdah, Fares
This course will trace the evolution of a city as it existed and as it was imagined. Views, historic maps, and ground-floor plans will be located in both time and space while their associated visual and spatial data will be integrated across digital platforms. Graduate students enroll in an additional bootcamp and mentor undergraduate students. Credit cannot be earned for HURC 432 and HURC 632. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)

HRC PRACTICUM IN CULTURAL HERITAGE
HURC 423

Instructor: Mulligan, John C.
This research-based course is conducted in partnership with cultural heritage institutions in Houston. Qualified and advanced students work 10 hours/week on site with curators, artists, archivists, center directors, and others to develop projects in specific research areas. Students meet regularly with instructor to discuss research and to present work at an end of semester symposium. Repeatable for Credit. (View Registrar Listing)